A computer screen targeted by a cyber attack (illustration).
A computer screen targeted by a cyber attack (illustration). (ALEXANDRE MARCHI / L’EST REPUBLICAIN / MAXPPP)

These are completely unrelated cases, but show the growing importance of the “cyber threat”. In the United States, first, activist hackers recovered surveillance footage from a Tesla factory in China and many other organizations. They hacked into the company that supplies the video cameras and hosts the footage in its cloud, a California start-up by the name of Verkada.

Hackers have also managed to spy on a prison, hospital rooms, a gym and even private homes. We are talking about 150,000 cameras potentially concerned. They disseminated some images on social networks, claiming to want to fight against the “surveillance capitalism”.

Much more serious, the giant cyberattack against Microsoft continues to shake the specialized services, in the United States and in Europe. Tens of thousands of businesses and government agencies around the world are believed to be affected. It was Microsoft’s Exchange system, the email service used through Outlook software, that was attacked. A security breach has allowed hackers to break into the servers of tens of thousands of businesses around the world.

This flaw was recently discovered by Microsoft, which immediately released a security update. But, as always, many businesses, especially SMBs that don’t have IT departments, haven’t updated. The result: hackers were able to recover potentially sensitive information and even introduce spyware, by getting their hands on credentials for logging into government or banking systems, including in Europe.

As of yet, there aren’t really any visible consequences, but the problem is, there is now a dormant espionage threat. According to the American authorities, it is a group of very structured Chinese hackers, called Hafnium and which counts 1000 engineers, according to Microsoft, which is at the origin of this attack. This led the White House to express official protests, not ruling out retaliatory actions against China. A case that touches on what specialists call the “cyber warfare”.

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