Prime Minister Boris Johnson will return to Parliament this week with a difficult agenda.

The Commons are back from summer recess on Monday and a series of major announcements could take place this week as Westminster kicks in after the recess.

Social care and potential tax hikes have been making headlines in recent days, with new rumors of an imminent Cabinet reshuffle.

Go here for the latest last minute updates from across the North East

Mr Johnson has long wanted to divert attention from the pandemic to his national agenda, but it will be far from straightforward, reports The Mirror.

There are still Covid cases to take care of, ranging from vaccine passports to jabs for children and NHS workers.

The crisis in Afghanistan is also expected to continue, with a statement expected from the prime minister on Monday.

Here are some of the announcements the government could make this week.

An anti-manifesto tax hike to pay for social care

The Prime Minister is facing a major backlash from the Conservatives against plans to increase national insurance contributions to pay for social care.

Mr Johnson has been in talks with Health Secretary Sajid Javid and Chancellor Rishi Sunak over the details in recent days, with an announcement expected as early as Tuesday.

The 2019 Tory manifesto contained a guarantee from Mr Johnson not to increase income tax, VAT or national insurance.

But the Prime Minister is also under pressure to keep the promise he made on the steps of Downing Street that year, when he said he had a plan to fix the ailing area.

He is believed to be preparing to announce a 1.25% increase in national insurance to raise around £ 10 billion a year, with a cap of £ 80,000 on lifetime contributions to care.

However, Number 10 said on Sunday details were still being worked out.

The plan, which is expected to be announced on Tuesday, is said to be part of a new NHS funding regulation.

But some Conservative MPs are furious, with ex-chancellor Philip Hammond saying the idea was “bad”.

“I think if the government goes ahead with the proposed increase in national insurance contributions, breaking a clear commitment to guarantee the cost of home care for the elderly, I think it would cause a backlash. very important, ”he said. TimesRadio.

“I think it would cause the government – the Conservative Party – significant damage.”

And the former prime minister’s aide Dominic Cummings told Tory MPs they would be branded liars if they supported the plan and urged them not to “sacrifice your reputation” (sic).

Video upload

Video unavailable

Changes to the triple lock-in of pensions

In another manifesto-shattering measure, Chancellor Rishi Sunak is set to temporarily remove the triple pension lockdown of some 12.3 million Britons.

The Conservatives have pledged to keep the measure in place in the last election, but Sunak is expected to tone it down significantly this week.

The triple lock is a government commitment to increase the state pension by 2.5% each year or based on inflation or wage increases – whichever is greater.

But the wage distortion caused by the pandemic means retirees could see an 8% increase next April.

The Chancellor is expected to announce a temporary move towards a “double lock” – the hike would therefore be based on 2.5% or inflation.

Last week, a Treasury source declined to confirm or deny Bloomberg’s information that the Chancellor could make the announcement as early as Tuesday.

Major announcements are expected from the government this week
Major announcements are expected from the government this week

A long-awaited cabinet reshuffle

The prime minister could overhaul his top team as early as this week, which could potentially distract from damaging disputes over tax hikes.

Rumors have spread in Westminster that the long-awaited Cabinet reshuffle could take place within days, with councilors ordered to block their agendas at the end of the week, according to the Mail on Sunday.

Mr Johnson hasn’t jostled his team for over 18 months.

The ministers in the sights would include Foreign Minister Dominic Raab and Education Secretary Gavin Williamson.

Extend Covid vaccines to every 12-15 years

A decision on whether to expand the vaccine rollout to every 12 to 15 year olds could also be made this week as students return to school.

The Joint Committee on Immunization and Immunization (JCVI) chose not to recommend vaccines for healthy under-16s last week because they said it would have a marginal benefit as children were at low risk. of Covid-19.

The case has now been passed on to the UK’s chief medical officers for the final say.

The best doctors will look at JCVI’s advice as well as broader issues, such as disruption of schooling and whether vaccinating children could protect their most vulnerable loved ones.

Should school uniforms be banned? Let us know what you think in our poll below.

Jabs may be required for NHS staff

Health Secretary Sajid Javid said …

More about this article: Read More
Source: www.chroniclelive.co.uk
This notice was published: 2021-09-06 05:00:00

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here